February 24, 2016

VR – Tomorrow’s World or Yesterday’s News?

Although I’ve been working in “digital” for 20 years now, I still try to maintain a level of cynicism when it comes to the next big thing. It’s that little devil’s advocate sitting on my shoulder that tempers my natural enthusiasm for all things tech. But I’d like to silence him for the moment and look ahead to where VR might go in terms of being a powerful marketing tool. Just think, when Facebook appeared nobody, guessed that it would become the advertising powerhouse it is today. When I was getting “poked” by people in the early days of the platform, I didn’t say to myself “this is going to transform the ad business”. Facebook wants to make VR a social experience, even though slapping a headset on is possibly the most anti-social thing you could do. But I won’t listen to my internal naysayer. As they said in the X-Files… I want to believe. So even though VR is a novelty right now let’s fast forward five years and imagine what it might become.

3038560-inline-i-1-google-volvo

Welcome to 2021 –the age of VR. Just like the early days of the internet, the biggest success stories of VR are porn and gaming. Being able to immersive yourself in the thrill of the moment has become the key selling point for VR. But brands have had to work harder to capture people’s attention in this VR future. Way back in 2015 we had already seen some early attempts at using VR as a marketing tool. Google’s Cardboard VR was used by Volvo to deliver an amazing Virtual Driving Experience.

http://www.volvocars.com/us/about/our-points-of-pride/google-cardboard

Another brand that created some early buzz about VR was Marriott with their Oculus powered teleporter that gave a full sensory travel experience.

http://travel-brilliantly.marriott.com/our-innovations/oculus-get-teleported

Marriott-Hotels-Teleporter

We’ve come a long way since then. Here, in good old 2021, VR has become mainstream. It has helped Facebook become the most valuable company in the world and every home has at least one VR headset. Samsung, Google, Microsoft, Apple along with Facebook are dominating the VR industry. Brands have discovered how to connect with consumers in new ways, delivering compelling experiences that capture the attention, are highly social and personally relevant. OK, enough marketing blurb. What does that mean from an end-user point of view? Many of my favorite brands are offering what has become known as ARX – Alternate Reality Experiences. I get to be hang out with celebrities as if they are right in front of me. My friends are there too, they look real thanks to high definition 3D avatars that are totally lifelike. Yes, these spaces we visit are full of product placement but these are brands I actually like. They are there if I’m interested and can interact with them, but otherwise I can just enjoy the moment, as a member of Beyonce’s band or helping Sherlock solve a crime. This isn’t storytelling – it’s storymaking. I’m amazed how personalized these experiences are. But then again, Artificial Intelligence is an everyday thing in 2021, so if it wasn’t tailored perfectly to me then something would be wrong. I spend hours wearing my VR headset since this reality is much prettier than the “real” world, especially now there are no more trees or wildlife in the city. I do all my shopping in the VR mall and my handy tactile orb gives me the sensation of touching (or even smelling) what I want to buy. It uses microjets of air to project sensations onto my hands so it feels like I’m holding that pair of shoes, those headphones or touching that self-driving car.

If I get bored of being myself I can step inside the head of any of my friends. See and hear what they are experiencing, reliving their (or our) best moments in full 3D video. If they’ve bought something new then I get to try it too, all thanks to the hyper-realistic experiences that VR brings.

——————

Back to reality now. It’s 2016 and VR is still in its infancy. For it to become mainstream and for brands to find it worth the investment it has to do several things:

1 – Be affordable (Samsung Gear VR is being given free with their new S7 phones)

2 – Be worth people’s attention (because there are plenty of other distractions)

3 – Be socially engaging (otherwise it will become a platform for loners and perverts – remember Second Life anyone?)

The geek in me hopes that VR will take off in a big way. After all the investment and excitement it would be a shame if it simply fades away and ends up forgotten in my drawer alongside my Minidisc player.

See you in five years…

 

September 14, 2015

Spike of creativity

Spikes Asia just announced the winners of it’s 2015 awards. It’s part of the group that also runs Cannes Lions and usually we see the Cannes winners dominate Spikes. This year there seems to be a bit more local flavour. Let’s take a look…

The Mobile Grand Prix went to a project from South Korea. Samsung’s “Look at me” campaign by Cheil was designed to show how mobile devices could be used for good, not just sharing food selfies. The project helped autistic children connect with people around them. It also won the PR Grand Prix and several golds.

Australia and New Zealand always perform well at Spikes being two of the strongest APAC countries when it comes to creativity. This Grand Prix for the Promo & Activation category was produced for BMW by DDB Auckland. It’s a simple April Fool’s stunt that made a lot of noise…

A project for India produced by Grey Singapore picked up the Innovation Grand Prix. The Life Saving Dot turned the traditional bindi, that almost every woman in India wears on her forehead, into a life-saving tool for delivering iodine to women in rural areas. A brilliantly simple yet clever idea.

Japan has traditionally been a strong performer at international awards and this year we saw Hakuhodo Kettle Tokyo win an Innovation Gold for another project that aims to help people in need. Working with the University of Tsukuba’s Special Need School they used technology to allow handicapped children to play the piano by just using their eyes…

Check out all the Spikes winners here >

February 6, 2014

Beyond the Superbowl

Everyone talks about the TV spots created especially for the Superbowl and how much they cost. But what about digital? How did these big brands leverage social, mobile and web to capitalize on their big spending on the big day?

According to blogger David Hibbs “Hashtags won as the main CTA with over 60% of the ads using some kind of #hashtag to keep the viewers engaged beyond 30-seconds. This is a major change. Hashtags have now become the “universal” way people can use the second screen and still partake in the conversation. Even though hashtags are most commonly associated with Twitter, brands now have a way to easily connect with their viewers and customers on their social platform of preference…Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, etc. URLs were almost non existent this year with only a handful of companies pointing customers to their homepage or social presence with a URL. While Shazam was big a few years ago, there were only a couple ads that still used this as an opportunity to extend experience”.

Some might say that Budweiser won the digital game with their Puppy spot which they released online days before the game to build the hype. With 43 million views and counting it’s safe to say they made a touchdown. But as Lincoln Bjorkman, Wunderman’s Global CCO said, “so this year’s killer digital strategy is the early release of a great ad on YouTube?”

But perhaps the real winner was Doritos with their $1 million Crash The Superbowl contest for the best Super Bowl commercial. That was the prize for fans of the brand who won the vote for coming up with the best commercial. Agencies were left on the sidelines while Doritos payed for airtime and offered $1 million to the ultimate winners. All entrants covered the casting, writing, and production of the videos themselves.

In the words of blogger Bill Faeth “this was a really smart game plan. In terms of money saved, Doritos won hands down. Still, they’ve done something even smarter than save money. The popular chip company will also earn themselves piles of social proof, and that’s something money can’t buy. When Doritos opened the competition to the general public, they received 5,500 entries. That’s 5,500 people who like the brand enough to put hard work into creating their own commercials. Of course, the $1 million dollar prize helped sweeten the deal, but that doesn’t inspire passion for the brand; it only inspires passion for the prize. Voters, also the general public (and probably Doritos lovers), can tell the difference between those who want to promote the company and those who just want to cash in. If you think this might not be the case, just take a look at some of the finalists”.

Crowdsourcing is something of an old idea but obviously it still works. If the result is content people want to share then everyone wins. Beyond Doritos there was not a lot of innovation around marketing the Superbowl. The one standout example of innovation would be H&M. As AdAge reported, “they aired a 30-second spot during the second quarter of Super Bowl XLVIII that let viewers with certain Samsung smart TVs use their remote controls to engage with the commercial and buy products from David Beckham’s Bodywear line.

The interactivity didn’t take viewers out of the regular broadcast stream. A small part of the screen presented a pop-up menu while the ad ran on the larger part of the screen. The pop-up menu offered product information, the ability to send that info to another device and the option to buy the product directly. The ad would still be interactive and shoppable for consumers who rewind to it using their DVRs”.

Obviously this technology was limited to a small number of people with the right TV but points the way forward when all TVs are connected.

Apparently the game itself was pretty dull and not all the ads were inspiring either. But there was still enough creative inspiration around this year’s Superbowl to get everyone talking.

Sources: www.responsys.com www.business2community.com adage.com

September 25, 2011

Spikes digital winners

The dust has settled and the advertising folk have left Singapore to be replaced by the Formula 1 fans for a weekend of noise and mayhem. Not much different then.

Let’s take a look at some of the digital campaigns that were awarded at the festival. The Grand Prix went to Colenso BBDO New Zealand for their Doggelgänger project. Their idea was based around human to canine pairing software, designed to connect homeless dogs to their human doubles. This state-of-the-art software analyses your features, and compares them with a nationwide database of real dogs looking for adoption. By partnering with shelters across the country, Doggelgänger has given homeless dogs everywhere the very best chance to set up that vital first meeting in the journey to finding a new home.

Gold went to several projects already featured heavily in previous awards including Uniqlo Lucky Line and Sour/Mirror – both from Japan. See the Cold, also from Japan, was developed by McCann and used people’s tweets about cough, fever, runny or stuffed nose, chills, throat, and headache to build a picture on the website of where the cold is, how it’s moving, and what its symptoms are. Sicknesses can be tracked day and night, symptom by symptom allowing pharmacies to stock the right amount of the right drugs at the right time: before the cold hits. And consumers can buy remedies they’re about to require.

Japan dominated silver too with some brilliant campaigns. Hakuhodo gave us the Samsung Space Balloon Project for the Galaxy SII. It was the world’s first LIVE communication challenge set in space. It’s also the world’s highest media development linked with many SNS sites and USTREAM. They live-streamed the 90 minutes flight of the GALAXY S II headed to space on a meteorological balloon. During the flight, they showed more than 3000 messages and icons of hope and dreams to encourage Japan on the beautiful display of GALAXY S II, live. SBP gathered an USTREAM ASIA record 380,000 unique viewers, 98000 tweets, and in the same month GALAXY S II’s share in Japan reached number one.

One of the few non-Japanese winners came from Soap in Australia. Their brief was to create an online promotion/platform for PAC-MAN which could help build awareness for upcoming products and showcase the power of HTML5 on Microsoft’s newly released IE9. Their “simple and catchy idea” was to let the global PAC-MAN community create & play their own maze to become part of the “World’s Biggest PAC-MAN” game. The ever expanding maze provided endless fun for PAC-MAN fans worldwide. There were 1.5 million visitors in the first 3 weeks, countless amounts of positive press for both clients and one huge hosting bill. All without any media spend.

Back to Japan for another silver winning project. Dentsu were asked by Ezaki Glico to change the image people had of their biscuit products as being cheap and childish. They developed the “smile chocolate factory”, a special production line in the real factory using high technology in biscuit and chocolate processing. People could make original chocolate biscuits by sending their smile via a website. The system analysed the face, generated the portrait sketch and drew it with chocolate on the biscuit. People could see the production line of “smile chocolate factory” in realtime with a webcam.

You can check out all the other winners here along with the best work from all the other categories. With this being an Asia Pacific award you’ll get to see some interesting work that might have been overlooked in other festivals. Until next year…

September 21, 2011

Spikes Asia part 2

What have the Simpson’s got to do with Spikes Asia? Well Simpson’s scriptwriter Joel Cohen was the speaker invited by DDB to talk about “Lessons in Creativity and Innovation from the Simpsons”. Easily the most entertaining speaker at the event, Joel explained how the writing team managed to stay original after 22 years on the air. He talked about some of the crazy scenarios that have appeared on the show and made a connection between that and innovation in our own industry. Joel explained how vital it is to connect with the audience before you innovate. What you say has to be relatable. At the same time big ideas don’t always fit into the context of the story so you have to filter. Joel had a few suggestions for anyone that hits a creative roadblock. Sometimes you just have to suggest the opposite of what you were thinking. But the best solution is jamming together with others to get more diverse ideas.

Laurie Coots, Chief Marketing Officer at TBWA did a seminar on the Gamification of advertising. With a stock photo heavy Powerpoint she said that gaming techniques drove participation leading to engagement and interaction. This leads to greater meaning and behavior change. In the attention economy we had to find greater brand value. The Starbucks app with its reward system was mentioned as one great example. However research shows that 80% of apps are downloaded less than 1000 times.  If you are using an app as part of your marketing campaign then gamification can help make participation addictive. Laurie shared an interesting case study for New York Library where gamification was used to get kids interested in books as a source of information that you can’t find through Google.

Wunderman US CEO Daniel Morel had the misfortune to speak first on day 3 meaning that the room was half empty. He presented a lot of statistics overlaid on stock photos and built his case around the need for Context, Community, Commerce and Creativity. With a big focus on mobile he presented cases from Austria airlines with their Red Guide, UrbanDaddy and HomePlus from Korea who saw sales go up by 130% and an 76% increase in members with their virtual stores in the subway. He was skeptical about co-creation saying that there was very little talent out there but that brands should listen to customers to get real insights. After showing the Decode with Jay-Z case (pronouncing the rapper’s name Gee Zay) he showed the Land Rover Mobile Fair Stand from Austria – a great example of how you can get your brand noticed and generate real results with some left-field thinking.

Jeff Benjamin from Crispin Porter + Bogusky was up next with a much more inspiring talk called Invent or Die. Ironically he opened with the example of Gutenberg who didn’t become rich with his invention of the printing press but died broke.  He said that only later did we realize what he had invented. Culture just wasn’t ready for it at the time. Jeff told us that it was the same for the steam engine and electricity. In a similar way it has taken 15 years for culture to finally catch up with technology and the internet. Not so long ago online dating seemed bizarre, online commerce seemed risky yet we now buy TVs from Amazon and even our notions of what friends are has been redefined by social networks. Digital technology is now an essential part of our lives and the public now expect innovation. Jeff said that the current creative revolution is being fueled by technology. If a brand is not inventing it isn’t going to be around much longer.

He gave a few tips for surviving:

Everyone can be an inventor – it isn’t just the creative department. Burger King chicken fries were invented by an account service guy in their agency.

Fill the void by working out what the consumer needs. The Pizza Hut pizza tracker came from the insight that ordering online is great but then you wonder where your pizza is at for the time it takes to arrive. The technology already existed within Pizza Hut to track employee efficiency. They just repurposed the data.

Prototype fast and often. Inventions don’t live on paper so take action to test your ideas.

Have fun – A great example is the Pringles Crunch Band app that came from their Sweden office.

Fail First. Fail Harder. It’s important to embrace failure and clients need to allow agencies to try things out that might seem risky.

Collaborate. It isn’t easy as many people don’t like sharing before an idea is fully formed. You need to be bold enough to bring in other opinions.

He showed some great examples of the agency inventing new things based on a simple brief. Small Business Saturday was not a campaign. They invented a day to help answer a need for the smaller companies that missed out on the retail frenzy of Black Friday and Cyber Monday that occurred every year after Thanksgiving.

Be fast and nimble, daring and relentlessly scrappy. You need to participate in technology to be able to invent new ways of using it. Be on Facebook and Twitter. The Whopper Sacrifice came about because the team were exploring what could be done with it.
Don’t stop – keep making it better. The Jello pudding face idea was a cool way to read the mood of people on Twitter. But rather than just use it online they came up with a giant pudding face billboard. Always ask what else you can do.

Be an entrepreneur. Pretend your client’s business is your own. What would you do? When the carrot farmers came with the brief they asked how the public could eat them as naturally as they eat junk food. So the carrots were packaged like packets of crisps (chips if you’re not English) and sold in vending machines.

Jeff talked about how the first 15% of work you do is 90% of the effort. That’s because you need to evolve your idea, experiment and keep changing it until it is right.

You need to invent where people are. That was the driver behind the Whopper Lust idea that ran on cable channel Direct TV.

Above all he said that we have to be delusionally positive. When you are asking yourself “how are we going to make this” and when you’re scared that’s when you find that positive energy breaks down walls.

Later I saw an inspiring talk by Mark Holden from PHd about 2016 – Beyond the Horizon. He started by talking about the famous IBM 1401 computer that is now in a museum. It filled a room but we have more computing power today in our mobile phones. The world is changing fast. Right now one in two people on earth has joined a social network. Indonesia has the second largest presence on Facebook with over 40 million users. If we consider the 1.2 billion social network members globally as “independent media owners” we can see the power of influence they have. He showed how in the UK 44% of mobile phone sales are influenced by online comments. In the next 5 years the true driver of business will be us – the people. But what drives us. It is the desire for abundance – everything, everyone and everywhere. He said that the future depends on Infrastructure, Interface and Internet.

Looking at Infrastructure & interface he predicted that by 2016 the cloud will be default. We’ll be using ultra HD connected TVs. Watching will be a social experience like we can see with HBO Connect.

You’ll be buying through your TV screen with t-commerce being worth 15 billion dollars by 2016. Embedded content will be accessed through natural user interfaces that will work like Kinect and use facial recognition to personalize information. Meanwhile mobile phones will be made with flexible graphene, maybe transparent with NFC, audio spotlight technology and use advanced augmented reality. The world will be seen through the “looking glass” of your mobile device with the internet smeared across cityscapes. Instore you can see instant user reviews while even your friends’ faces will launch augmented reality content.

The internet will continue to harness HTML5 so the web becomes one big app. We’ll see an increased socialization of the web where links become likes, vertical searches mean you can buy straight from search results and you’ll get direct answers to complex questions through AI. Social commerce will dominate and we’ll see an increase in gamification of the web to drive deeper engagement.

For medial planners there will be a social dashboard that will allow everyone to be tailored – even TV ads. There will be a need for audience management platforms where every aspect of brand communication can be optimized. The biggest threat will be social contagion since the power of consumer influence will be even bigger than today.

So what will the agency of 2016 look like? Creative will be more like a technology industry while media will be a data industry.

For the full story buy the book.
2016: Beyond the Horizon

In my next post I’ll share some of the award winning work from Spikes. As usual the Japanese dominated but Australia and New Zealand gave everyone a run for their money.

September 19, 2011

Welcome to Spikes Asia

I haven’t been to Singapore in over 10 years. What a difference a decade makes. It’s become like physical manifestation of the internet. Overblown, full of ways to spend money and geared for entertainment. Spikes Asia 2011, like every other advertising festival today, has digital on the brain. Every speaker and panelist says that the industry has dramatically changed. So how come the work submitted in the digital category was not hung on the wall with the other categories? Some things never change.

The first seminar off the block was brought to us by Coca Cola and crowdsourcing platform eYeka. The title – Is tomorrow’s agency the consumer? With panelists from both Coke and eYeka along with agency folk from Draft FCB and BBH plus someone from Diageo there was a lot of debate. The featured project involved co-creation with the public for a Coke competition called “Energizing Refreshment”. Some amazing figures were mentioned such as the 1.6 million submissions within China when Coke launched a previos crowdsourced campaign. The challenge was to sift through all of that to find the “diamonds in the shit” as one panelist put it. Would agencies become curators rather than being the sole producers of the creative ideas? The panelist from eYeka suggested that crowdsourcing accelerates innovation for brands. Co-creation questions the role of agency. The public now competes with agency creative departments. There are “millions of talented people out there” so why restrict yourself to an agency? Clients like Coke are looking for creative collectives rather than agencies where you might mix up “teenagers with professionals” as one speaker suggested. It was pointed out that the most popular Superbowl ad in 2011 was a $500 film created by a member of the public. It had “authenticity and simplicity”. Co-creation is “not about changing advertising – it’s about creating an environment where public gets involved with the brand”. One panelist said that the role of agencies needs to change for co-creation – but can they? Many agencies “missed the boat with the internet revolution and are still trying to catch up”. During question time I pointed out that the best work submitted in crowdsourced projects was most likely submitted by moonlighting agency creatives rather than the public. The speaker from eYeka admitted that a number of participants are from agencies but over 60% are non-professionals from the general public. Then they showed the winning entry for the “Energized Refreshment” competition… who just happens to be a motion graphics designer based in Brighton UK. Say no more.

Another interesting seminar was hosted by Yahoo and covered emerging markets such as Vietnam, Philippines and Indonesia where 6 out of 10 people that access the internet do so via mobile phones. There was a lot of discussion about the internet not being the same there than in other countries – especially the west. We should not try to impose a western way of thinking on these new markets. We need to bring “5000 years of experience and knowledge” to whatever we do with digital.

There followed an inspiring presentation from JWT about breeding creativity with cultural diversity. Shame all their links to sound and video failed as it was a thoughtful and well put together seminar. They began by showing how Picasso did not find his path until he saw an exhibition of African art while the architect Frank Lloyd Wright was highly influenced by Japanese design. Special guest Gilles Peterson is a DJ that has spent his career exploring the cultural exchanges that can make music so diverse. In his words, to be “truly creative you need to get out of your comfort zone”.
Havana Cultura: Remixed // Gilles Peterson Bonus DJ Mix by gillespeterson

Matias Palm-Jensen, formerly of FarFar but now chief innovation officer at McCann, presented his pinball approach to advertising. The old way was more like bowling where you sent your ball down the alley hoping it will knock down as many pins as possible – then you turn your back and walk away. Now things are a lot more dynamic with assets, stories, formats, vehicles, destinations, conversations that then create more assets… and the ball keeps moving. Today every creative idea “needs a digital/social platform”. Fascinating guy with a big job ahead of him at McCann.

This post is getting a bit long so I’ll follow up with a second one featuring Microsoft Advertising, TBWA and Joel Cohen – one of the writers for the Simpsons who showed everyone how to make an entertaining presentation.

August 30, 2011

Uncover your world

Amazing new mobile ad from Google to promote their search app. Like all the advertising Google puts out it is engaging, entertaining and reveals what the services can do by experiencing them.

The making of is quite incredible too where the AdMob team shows how 3D printing was used as the basis of a virtual world people could explore to uncover all the product features.

May 21, 2011

CLIO Interactive winners

The awards season rolls onwards, this time with the CLIOS. Only a month until the Cannes craziness commences. But for now let’s look at what the CLIOS juries chose to get gold, silver, bronze and more…

Vail EpicMix: Crispin Porter + Bogusky

How do you transform the skiing experience using mobile technology (and win a gold at the CLIOS)? Here’s how…

IKEA -Homemade is best: Forsman & Bodenfors

As well as winning gold for the interactive campaign that supported the amazing Homemade is best cookbooks they also won silver for the Kondis app that was part of the same campaign. They showed you some delicious cake recipes but you had to earn them by running a certain distance. The app told you when you had run far enough.

SOUR/MIRROR: Masashi + Qanta + Saqoosha + Hiroki

This interactive music video looks a bit painful to get going but once it does the results are pretty amazing. This won a silver.

Streetmuseum: Brothers and Sisters

A bronze award went to this amazing app for The Museum of London that overlayed photos of the old city onto the current view seen through your iPhone.

And the Grand Clio goes to…

Wilderness Downtown: Google Creative Lab and B-Reel

I think everyone has seen this by now but it’s worth looking at the making of to see how you can still be truly innovative in digital today. Congratulations guys (and great song too).

May 17, 2011

One Show Interactive 2011

So the winners are in and they are worthy. Here are some of this year’s gold award winners. No doubt we’ll be seeing much more if these projects as the awards season continues…

Google Chrome Fastball

To promote a fast browser to an audience that’s immune to banners and doesn’t even know what a browser is, BBH created Chrome FastBall, a race across the Internet. This first YouTube game of its kind demonstrated how your web experience is faster and easier when using Google Chrome.

Uniqlo Lucky Line

To get people excited about a new store opening Dentsu invented the “Lucky Line” where people could join the queue via Facebook and Twitter to get discounts when the store opened.


VW True Life Costs

To address the misconception that the car brand is expensive DDB UK created a website that provided an engaging, easy to understand analogy of Volkswagen’s impressive ‘whole life costs’ affordability.

IKEA Unbox the banner

As part of the spring campaign for discounted products from IKEA, Grabarz & Partners developed an online promotion that was true to the IKEA philosophy: save money by assembling it yourself. Check it out here.

Nike + GPS App

Five years ago, Nike put a chip in a shoe and changed the sport of running. Today, they’re doing it again. Introducing the Nike+ GPS app: Now, runners can join the world’s largest running club by simply downloading the app, whether laced in Nike shoes or not. Nike+ is in your pocket, ready for a run anytime. Running outdoors, GPS tracks your run—indoors, the accelerometer detects movement. Any friend who “likes” or comments on your Facebook status gives you an audible “cheer” via your headphones. Developed by R/GA of course.


There are lots more gold winners (if you can get the One Show website to scroll – I couldn’t) plus don’t forget to check out the silvers and bronzes too. Lots of inspiring stuff there.

April 11, 2011

Month of tweets #3

The month of March slid by in a blink of an eye. Let’s take a look back at some of the things I tweeted and retweeted that are worth a second glance…

Cool YouTube takeover for Schick Hydro by JWT Sydney…http://bit.ly/f0Y1rT

  • I’m sure these things cost a bucketload of money. Cool to look at but do they deliver results. Would love to know.

Brands do good… RT @annaloop: Kellog digital campaign: “Photograph your Breakfast & give a meal to a poor Child” http://nyti.ms/eYTkBW

  • After Pepsi Refresh here is another example of a brand using cause marketing to attract more customers.

Looks great RT @fastcompany: Personalized iPad Magazine Zite Learns As You Read, Challenges @Flipboard in the process: http://bit.ly/fSpeyY

  • I’m sure we’ll see more of these as time passes. Is personalisation the way to go or will people want to be surprised by things that maybe were not for them but are new discoveries?

Mercedes-Benz: Transparent Walls – very smart idea…

  • By Ad Agency Jung von Matt in Germany. Love this kind of thing – useful, innovative and clever.

Exciting stuff… RT @fastcompany: Augmented Reality May Be the iPad 2’s Secret Killer App http://bit.ly/h1vgPw

  • People have been bitching about the camera on the back (and front) of the iPad 2. So it won’t replace your camera anytime soon but it could provide some other cool functions.

Adidas All In Projection Mapping in Paris. Very Cool…

  • Will we get bored of seeing this kind of thing? By the looks on the faces of the spectators we might soon be asking when it will be over.

Cool project… RT @Sergethew: Sweet car reveal by Hyundai, mixing light sculpture & interactivity – http://bit.ly/dH5bq5

  • Would love to do a project like this. Inspiring stuff.

If your agency can’t afford to send you to Cannes – find a creative solution… http://bit.ly/f7TlSa

  • The silly season is soon approaching and people are trying to find all sorts of ways to get a ticket to go. Just get a nomination and that might help.

Kraft campaign for Mac & Cheese – best tweets turned into TVCs… http://on.fb.me/eE9jXP

  • They did it once with Old Spice guy. Why waste a good idea on one client?


As usual a little something to end with a smile…

Ashamed to say one is mine 🙁 RT @alleyinsider: The 22 Most Hilarious, Unfortunately Placed Ads Ever by @shontelaylay http://read.bi/eXRioR