May 14, 2014

New York Festivals Shine

As a judge during this year’s New York Festivals I had the pleasure (and the pain) to see all the shortlisted entries. So seeing which projects won doesn’t come as much of a surprise. Below are some of my own favorites from the winners.

Nike SB APP – R/GA

Digital: First Prize

Until now Nike apps have focused mainly on running, fitness training and soccer but in 2013 (to quote the R/GA case study) they collaborated with pro riders to create never-before-seen digital skate experiences. It changed the way skaters participated in the world’s biggest action sport.

The Nike SB App helps skaters progress in their sport, connect with their peers and pro riders, and earn respect for one another with features like video posting and challenges, and building their personal skate history.

The app features a multi-angle video learning system, letting users watch trick videos from multiple directions. They can go head-to-head in virtual games of S.K.A.T.E. and get exclusive access to live-streamed Nike Pro events.

To launch the app, 28 of the world’s best skaters were brought together for 24 hours and challenged to complete all 616 tricks in the Trick Tree while the world watched live on YouTube.

GEOX. 7 Days of Rain – SMFB with Media Monks

Digital: First prize

We’ve seen some beautiful work from Geox in the past couple of years. This time, to promote the FW 13 Amphibiox collection (a waterproof line produced by Geox), the agency decided to get quirky by getting one man live for 7 days under a man-made cloud.

LOWE’S Vine Fix in Six – BBDO

Digital: Second Prize

Lowe’s is the second largest home improvement retailer in the world and they’re in the business of providing “how to” tips. When the agency saw Vine, they saw an opportunity.

To quote the agency, “in the first campaign of its kind, we used Vine as a way to bring useful home improvement tips to life. Using stop-motion animation techniques, we created over 50 six-second films that were as entertaining as they were useful. We called it Lowe’s Fix in Six”.

The campaign was recognized by the press and users alike for bringing meaning to a platform often associated with trivial curiosities, rather than compelling content.

Perrier Secret Place – Fighting Fish

Digital: Second Prize

Amazing project with extremely high production values. To quote the agency, “PerrierSecretPlace is a digital experience designed to enable people to party in a way they never could before, but have always dreamed about. It’s the first interactive film that puts you in the shoes of a guest at a very special party, where they live their craziest fantasies. To do so, all characters that you see on screen are clickable”.

By playing their role, you can live their fantasy. Choose among 60 lives, and as many fantasies as you want. There are almost 10,000 different ways to experience this party, conceived with a real movie studio production for 18 months. To give users the opportunity to continue the party in real life, there’s a hidden a secret Perrier bottle somewhere in the party. If found, it could give the user a chance to win an exclusive invitation and go to one of the craziest parties all around the world.

Volvo Trucks Live Test Series – Forsman & Bodenfors

Integrated: First Prize

Everyone knows the Van Damme video stunt. But the whole campaign was amazing. According the agency’s website, “the creative idea was to carry out extreme tests of relevant product features, in a live set up, where the outcome could never be guaranteed. In this way we could thrill and engage the widest possible audience while still providing a valid demonstration of the new truck. If our live test films could evoke enough interest, then we might be able to get all the way through to the purchasers”.

No doubt we’ll be seeing many of these project in upcoming award shows. Great work always rises above.

September 13, 2013

AMCHAM Advertising After Party

Last night Nils Anderson, Y&R China’s Chief Creative Officer, and I jointly presented at a special event hosted by the American Chamber of Commerce in Shanghai. We wanted to share the winning campaigns from global advertising festivals like Cannes Lions to business leaders in China. I thought it would be interesting to share my own part of the presentation here.

While Nils focused on the Film category and spoke in depth about the craft that goes into winning work, I covered many of the other categories. I began by talking about the dramatic changes the advertising business has gone through since the Mad Men era. Just look at the picture below to see how quickly mobile devices have become the main way to create and consume media. Both show the announcement of a new Pope just 8 years apart.

Yet even with such amazing developments in technology, it is ideas that win not techniques or (dare I say it) gimmicks. In my presentation I began with a look at the category of DIRECT which is all about targeted communication with a clearly identifiable call-to-action or response mechanism. It’s all about having a measurable response.

This multi award-winning campaign from McCann Melbourne was based on real human insight. Take a serious message then make it fun and engaging. Make something that people want to share. Allow people to participate and own the campaign so the message gets magnified. The results speak for themselves. It didn’t just connect with people but changed behavior and demonstrates where our industry is going – harnessing the power of digital & social to seed the message.

The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals teamed up with MINI Cooper to teach dogs how to operate a car, in the hopes that it will draw attention to the talented and adorable dogs that were up for adoption. It shows the power of talk value in a campaign in order to capture attention.

When the laughs died down I then went on to talk about winners in the Cannes Cyber Lions. Very few people use the term “cyber” these days. It’s a throwback to the late 90s when the internet was still science fiction to many people. Now people talk about “digital” which is already sounding narrow and old fashioned. Maybe, after 5 years, I need to retire this blog if that’s the case.

The internet and social media as radically changed the advertising industry as much as other industries like music. But rather than being its death it breathed new life into what we do. Look at any great campaign now and see how it harnesses the power of digital to connect with consumers in ways not possible only 15 years ago.

Oreo’s 100th birthday mission was to help everyone around the world celebrate the child inside.  Draft FCB’s “Daily Twist” aimed to filter the world through the “playful imagination of Oreo.” It went way beyond a simple print campaign as it was designed to spark conversation and sharing on social platforms. On Facebook alone the population of fans grew to 27.7 million!

When an Adidas store is closed can you still allow people passing by to buy your clothes? That was the questions answered by agency TBWA Helsinki. It really shows how broad the category is.

It has been a long time coming but mobile marketing is now a force to be reckoned with. Today almost everyone carries smartphones and in many countries they are the primary access point to the internet. Mobile opens up lots of amazing opportunities to connect with consumers to deliver timely and relevant messages or to provide utility.

People love free wifi so Ogilvy Paris came up with an award-winning idea for their client Mattel by offering win free Wi-Fi minutes in places where there isn’t any. All you had to do was play Scrabble and your words became passwords to access the free Wi-Fi connection. You could stay connected as long as you are good at spelling words on Scrabble!

When everyone thinks of mobile they immediately think of high-end smartphones and sophisticated apps. But Philippines agency DM9 used a simple and low-tech solution to make a profound sustainable impact using the simplest phones. It shows how creative you can be with technology when it comes to solving problems

In the PROMO category it’s all about targeted online communication with a clearly identifiable call-to-action or response mechanism.

Sometimes the product becomes the campaign especially when you do something innovative. Coca Cola in with Ogilvy Paris and Singapore developed a can with a difference. One you could share without sharing germs.

How do you get more people to become organ donors? Ogilvy and Mather Brazil took real patients on organ-transplant waiting lists and created films directed at fans of the Sport Club Recife soccer team—telling them their hearts will keep beating for the team, even after they are gone, if they sign up to be an organ donor.

Like award ceremonies themselves I kept the best until last with the Titanium category from Cannes. Sometimes ideas are too big and multi-dimensional to fit into a single category. That’s why festivals like Cannes Lions created Titanium awards. The idea is everything, whether it’s for a car or toothpaste, telecommunications or charity, big budget or low budget.

“The Beauty Inside” by Pereira & O’Dell, which won major awards in digital, film and branded content categories, was born out of a powerful brand truth—just like an Intel processor, it’s what inside that counts. The campaign involved episodic films that followed the story of Alex, a man who wakes up looking like a different person every day. Apart from being “really social at its core” and “really beautiful” the smartest part was the integral role the brands played in the film. At Cannes it won grand prix in Cyber, Branded Content as well as Titanium.

Another Titanium winner came from Nike. When you are not sponsoring the Olympics how can your brand be heard? Nike tested the limits of the Olympic rules on ambush marketing with a global campaign by Wieden & Kennedy featuring everyday athletes and ordinary people enjoying sport in places around the world named London. Anybody could be their own champion no matter how great their achievement.

In fact, if there is one big trend recently in awards festivals it is the number of campaigns where brands are on a mission to do good. It’s not just about changing the world but helping people have a better outlook on life, to treat others and themselves with respect. Brands that are seen to do good are more attractive to consumers. Many of the cases I shared at the event reflect this. One of the Titanium Gold winners epitomized this trend.

Real Beauty Sketches is beautifully simple idea from Ogilvy Brazil centered on the insight that women often see themselves as being unattractive when in fact they are prettier than they think. The result is emotionally powerful and helped spark meaningful online conversations.

A saw a few tearful people in the audience so decided that I couldn’t leave them feeling down. I ended by demonstration that when a campaign is so successful you have to be prepared for one thing – to be parodied…

January 16, 2013

Cross-culture creativity

Thanks to the internet we now live in a global culture. Anyone can see the same thing at the same time. Even with the “great firewall” the Chinese have ways to access to the same content as someone in New York, London or Sydney. Because of this more and more brands are seeking to communicate with one global voice because it’s impossible to put up walls between countries.

So how can we create campaigns that cross cultures and are meaningful wherever you are in the world? First we need to be sensitive about cultural differences

It’s not just about translating text from one language to the next. We need to consider cultural values, etiquette humor and slang. A global agency needs local people to help develop a truly universal campaign. Otherwise this might happen…

When Pepsi entered the Chinese market, the translation of their slogan “Pepsi Brings you Back to Life” was a little more literal than they intended. In Chinese, the slogan meant, “Pepsi Brings Your Ancestors Back from the Grave.”

When Kentucky Fried Chicken first opened stores in China, it didn’t take long before they discovered their slogan, “finger lickin’ good” translated to “eat your fingers off.”

When Ford introduced the Pinto in Brazil, they were confused as to why sales were going nowhere. The company later learned “Pinto” is slang for “tiny male genitals” in Brazil. Ford ultimately changed the car’s name to Corcel, which means ‘horse’ in Portuguese.

Can a brand campaign be universally understood and loved? Look at this recent example from the world of music to see how something can cross cultural boundaries. Gangnam Style has become the most watched video on Youtube. How can a tubby man singing in Korean become a global hit? He stuck a universal chord by combining a simple tune with a dance move anyone can copy. Is it meaningless fun? Of course! But it went around the world like wildfire.

Coincidentally the recent launches of Microsoft Windows 8 and Surface were essentially marketing messages wrapped inside music videos. Easy to use across cultures but can the message be more meaningful?

Global campaigns need to touch the hearts and minds of everyone no matter what their culture of language is. We could learn a lot from Pepsi who recently launched a new global campaign. Their new theme of “Live for Now” is a rallying cry as well as a clear brand spirit that is embodied by a pop-culture-focused campaign. It’s centered around a social and content curation platform called Pepsi Pulse.

“Live for Now” came out of “the desire to build a global positioning for our flagship brand Pepsi,” says president, global enjoyment, brands, and chief creative officer of PepsiCo, Brad Jakeman. “It’s the culmination of 9 months of work around the world to understand the unique place that Pepsi already owns in people’s hearts and minds.” Jakeman says the research revolved around finding out how Pepsi “loyalists” defined themselves, and he says that what emerged as a theme was “the notion of making the most of every moment.”

The Nike campaign “Find your greatness” is a great example of a message that resonated with people anywhere in the world – especially during the London Olympics when ordinary people could only admire the superhuman athletes performing. Running across 25 countries the campaign sought to inspire everyone to find their own moment of greatness and push themselves a little further. The underlying message is simple – if you have a body you are an athlete.

Cross-culture creativity relies on universal human insights to develop a message that connects with people. It can be on a deep or superficial level. But it comes down to understanding the humanity that unites us beyond language, culture or traditions.

Finally, a brand can’t just say something, it has to live it too. So find your truth and then make it real. In every message, connection and action – be true to who you are.

July 26, 2012

The internet’s 3rd wave

As casual gaming company Zygna tanks, losing 42 percent of its value with a knock-on effect to Facebook, the writing is on the wall that the second dotcom bubble is ready to pop. For those of us in the business who lived through the first one it’s time to look beyond the current worries and consider where to go from here. The first bubble burst when too many companies were trying to build online businesses that nobody needed. It was the wild west when good money was thrown at bad ideas. The industry was smarting for a while but came back strong on the back of social. But it has been clear for some time that it couldn’t last.

You need to look at it from three sides. The dotcoms themselves, the advertising industry and most of all the public. With the swift success of social and the app economy many dotcoms sprung up based on the insatiable appetite of the public for anything new. Being able to connect with friends and spend hours oversharing or killing time with angry birds has created a generation of digital addicts. Marketers saw this phenomenon and jumped on the bandwagon either putting ads in the middle of all this hyperactivity or creating their own branded experiences to feed the audience’s addiction. Maybe it’s the global economic downturn that has been a splash of cold water in the face of the public but suddenly lots of people don’t want to waste their time sharing, liking or playing mindless games.

So what’s next? Can we get a glimpse of the internet’s 3rd wave already?

My personal opinion is that we are entering the Age of Usefulness. It will still be social but above all it will help people make the most of their time not waste it. Nike Fuel is just one example of this. A brand that has a true purpose in people’s lives and is building utility into its products that uses digital as the infrastructure behind a meaningful relationship with customers. We’re going to see more brands seeking to have this kind of purpose in people’s lives and this will be reflected in their marketing. Where does this leave all the dotcoms and startups designed to distract people with meaningless amusements? Many will fade away but some will rethink what they offer to the public. In this Age of Usefulness people will be seeking value. If time is currency then they will want to invest it wisely. To enrich their lives and relationships. Brands will have to be more responsible and answerable for what they sell and what they stand for. Now that can only be a positive thing.

The next bubble burst will be painful but what comes afterwards will be something more substantial and be a true fulfillment of the internet’s promise. Tim Berners-Lee will be able to be very proud of his creation once more.

June 25, 2012

Cannes Reinvented

When the Cannes Lions changed their mantra to being a “festival of creativity” it was because of the sea change that digital was stirring where the word “advertising” was quickly becoming rather meaningless. In many ways “digital” is an obsolete word today since it has become the electricity that runs through every aspect of our life. With this year’s Cannes Lions we’ve reached that tipping point when every brand and every agency uses the power of digital to connect consumers with brands – sometimes literally.

As we can see from the Titanium Grand Prix winner for Nike + Fuelband. It goes beyond communication and becomes communion. Between consumers and the brand, with the product and with each other.

Almost every winner in every category has digital running through it. In Branded Content & Entertainment the Grand Prix when to Chipotle with their film using a digital-first strategy, first launching on YouTube with no paid media support. The launch was supported with an earned media plan and the social media assets of Chipotle, Willie Nelson and Coldplay to a collective audience of 21m Facebook fans.

In the Direct category a huge percentage of the Gold winners were digitally-centric including this project for Montblanc. This international campaign conceived for the web and a worldwide audience and target, was designed to build maximum awarness for Montblanc as a watchmaker brand. The simple idea was to ask people to create a 1-second-long video that celebrated the fragile beauty that can be found in this small unit of time. They teamed up with film-director Wim Wenders and challenged people to capture beauty in a 1-second-long video, creating the shortest ever short-film contest. People competed online at montblanc-onesecond.com by uploading their one-second videos of beauty.


It’s the same story in Promo & Activation. Many of the top winners were either infused with digital goodness or relied on digital channels to get their message out there. Mobile is also becoming a great tool for activation and in this project George Patterson Y&R Melbourne has created the first medically diagnosable advertising for the Australian Defence Force.

These are exciting times to be in the “advertising” business. There are so many amazing possibilities right now thanks to the power digital gives us. The biggest challenge is finding the most relevant and meaningful idea. Because at the end of the day that’s what counts. It’s not the technology itself but what you do with it. Digital may have transformed Cannes but big ideas still rule.

June 21, 2012

Cyber Grand Prix – this is the new digital

Another year and another wake up call for the advertising industry. Everything is now digital but not how you think. From the Outdoor Lions to PR and Promo, everything has digital running through it – because that’s how it should be. It reflects the reality of the world we live in. The internet is like air. Who can live without it today? Anyway, the Cyber Lions were announced and we have two worthy winners. Twitter still seems to be on the rise as a great marketing tool (maybe because they don’t have a CEO who is a tool) and this project for Visit Sweden was a risky idea that really paid off. As reported on AdAge, “the Swedish Institute’s “Curators of Sweden” campaign, launched at the end of 2011, handed over Sweden’s national Twitter handle (@Sweden) to Sweden’s natives in order to showcase the diversity of the Swedish national character, in effect, launching “The world’s most democratic Twitter account.” Each week, a new curator was chosen to man the account, including a writer, teacher, priest and lesbian trucker. The campaign sparked recent controversy for featuring an irreverent young mother named Sonja Abrahamsson who expressed anti-Semitic remarks but also inspired (American) comedian Stephen Colbert petitioning to be the first non-Swede to take over the account”.

The other winner is was the work done for Nike and their Fuelband. It takes the Nike + idea to a whole new level. Haven’t found the case video yet but R/GA  developed an “immersive media launch event and participatory art installation around the concept of ‘what fuels New York’. This evolved into a day of high energy missions and cultural activities all over the city, where the influencers were broken into teams and competed to earn the most fuel points. As a launching ground for the missions we created a futuristic departure space with motion-activated interactive light installations and leader boards displaying real-time fuel data. The FUELWALL interactive light installation became the inspiration for a series of responsive LED wall installations that we created in conjunction with Nike+Fuelband launch events”.

May 17, 2011

One Show Interactive 2011

So the winners are in and they are worthy. Here are some of this year’s gold award winners. No doubt we’ll be seeing much more if these projects as the awards season continues…

Google Chrome Fastball

To promote a fast browser to an audience that’s immune to banners and doesn’t even know what a browser is, BBH created Chrome FastBall, a race across the Internet. This first YouTube game of its kind demonstrated how your web experience is faster and easier when using Google Chrome.

Uniqlo Lucky Line

To get people excited about a new store opening Dentsu invented the “Lucky Line” where people could join the queue via Facebook and Twitter to get discounts when the store opened.


VW True Life Costs

To address the misconception that the car brand is expensive DDB UK created a website that provided an engaging, easy to understand analogy of Volkswagen’s impressive ‘whole life costs’ affordability.

IKEA Unbox the banner

As part of the spring campaign for discounted products from IKEA, Grabarz & Partners developed an online promotion that was true to the IKEA philosophy: save money by assembling it yourself. Check it out here.

Nike + GPS App

Five years ago, Nike put a chip in a shoe and changed the sport of running. Today, they’re doing it again. Introducing the Nike+ GPS app: Now, runners can join the world’s largest running club by simply downloading the app, whether laced in Nike shoes or not. Nike+ is in your pocket, ready for a run anytime. Running outdoors, GPS tracks your run—indoors, the accelerometer detects movement. Any friend who “likes” or comments on your Facebook status gives you an audible “cheer” via your headphones. Developed by R/GA of course.


There are lots more gold winners (if you can get the One Show website to scroll – I couldn’t) plus don’t forget to check out the silvers and bronzes too. Lots of inspiring stuff there.

May 6, 2011

Month of Tweets # 4

April was a month of Easter Eggs, Royal Weddings and other equally forgettable things. But so as not to forget some of the cool things I tweeted last month here is a round up of the best…

Very cool… RT @adenhepburn: New Digital Buzz Post: Xbox Kinect: Become Your Own Souvenir! http://bit.ly/dGeMG4

  • I love Kinect hacks and 3D printing so put them together and I am in digital heaven!

—–
Sweet… RT @PeteFyfe: This is quite smart. 3D projection mapping on a small scale for Vodafone: http://bit.ly/fC5ZRy

  • We are seeing more innovative uses of 3D projection mapping being the big brashy building projections being watched by pretty agency girls. This one is very cool.

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Gaming for a good cause – some great examples. RT @simonmainwaring: Zynga: How the virtual world can save the real world. http://ow.ly/4z1M5

  • We all know how casual gaming is a huge market and this article shows how this audience has a heart as well as spare time to waste growing virtual cabbages and such.

Interesting stuff… RT @ktroia: Razorfish5: Technologies That Will Change The Business of Brands http://ow.ly/1cbUGE

  • I don’t mind plugging other agencies as long as they are sharing great articles like this one…

Ads that analyze and target you personally – interesting article on CNN http://bit.ly/fTq4nQ

  • Immersive Labs have developed a system where your computer analyses your face to target ads just for you. Will this take off or will people think this is taking things too far?

Everyone copies, Apple included. It’s how you do it that matters – article on The Telegraph UK http://bit.ly/hS8uao

  • With Apple likely to be the most valuable company on the planet before too long it is interesting to read how they didn’t get there by being original – just by copying better than anyone else.

I like… RT @ThePersuader: Brilliant use of #RFID helps #Renaultbring Facebook ‘Likes’ to life [Video]. Love it! http://ow.ly/4G7Xg

  • In the future we will probably all be “liking” things in the real world by swiping our mobile phones. Is this a taste of what’s to come or just a gimmick?

Very cool… Nike Software Turns Runners’ Footsteps Into Loopy, Swooshy Paintings – on FastCo Design http://bit.ly/euXxOr

  • This kind of project really excites me even though I know that it would only appeal to a limited audience. But who cares? it’s looks fantastic.

They shoot they score… RT @contagiousmag: Heineken hits the back of the net with the launch of Star Player from @AKQA http://j.mp/mq4ET6

  • Could this be the future of an different kind of interactive TV experience?

I usually end with a smile but thought I’d buck the trend with this sad tale of a fantastic agency that has closed its doors due to some unfortunate circumstances. Thanks for inspiring us Modernista!

Sad story… RT @Adweek: The rise and fall of Modernista.http://bit.ly/k9jEfb

January 28, 2011

Month of tweets #1

Since moving to China my time on Twitter and here on my blog has dropped considerably. I’m transitioning from my weekly tweets roundup (which was not that regular if we are being honest) to a monthly one. So here is the 1st in my Month of Tweets…

2011 – the year of HTML5?… RT @BenShaw: PSFK » Nike’s New Site Uses HTML5 to Scroll Towards A ‘Better World’ http://ow.ly/3yx62

  • I’ve heard that it doesn’t work on an iPad (I still don’t have one!!!). Interesting all the same.

Cyber stalking is good for business 🙂 RT @ericphu: I love this KLM campaign idea… brilliant.

  • Everyone has probably seen this by now. But if you haven’t then you’ll wish you had this idea.

Angry Birds unplugged? A new board game inspired by the app http://bit.ly/dJEA4a

  • Milking the idea for all it’s got before people get bored…

Clever stuff from Brazil… Gol Airlines: Mobile Controlled Banner Game – on DigitalBuzzBlog http://bit.ly/fR3nR4

  • Few people will have the patience to do this but it doesn’t stop it from being an innovative idea.

Amazing… RT @thaz7: Great read from @fastcompany on the influence of the social networks in China. http://bit.ly/e15BWq

  • Seeing it firsthand is quite something. If you think social media is big then it’s even bigger in China.

Scary? RT @GaryPHayes: The Future According to Schmidt: “Augmented Humanity,” Integrated Into Google | Fast Company http://bit.ly/iiXA3u

  • How far does Google want to get inside our lives? This article might make you a little nervous.

Nice concept… Nike connects global runners via ‘Ekiden’ social contest – http://bit.ly/gjQ90Z

  • When you have such a powerful branded utility platform like Nike Plus there is no end to the ideas you can build upon it. This one from Japan connects runners from all over the world. Great idea from W+K.

As usual I like to end with a smile. This banner concept brings to life the Ikea self-assembly philosophy perfectly.

Sweet idea for Ikea… RT @hardwidge: Ikea: Unbox the Banner 2 on BannerBlog: http://bit.ly/gYmz0E

November 17, 2010

Asia Pacific Winners

Last night I attended the Campaign Asia Digital Media Awards gala presentation in Beijing and there were some great winners from agencies across the region. One of the night’s big winners was Colenso BBDO / AIM Proximity of New Zealand who won the platinum award for best overall campaign for Yellow Chocolate. This amazing project for Yellow Pages also won a gold at Cannes and demonstrates a new way of thinking within agencies. These are the same people who brought us the Best Job in the World. Talking to the team afterwards they were telling me how that campaign and this one for Yellow Pages has completely transformed their agency. Now they approach projects in a completely new way compared to more traditional agencies. All the key people have an equal place at the table from the start where they develop the core idea that answers the client’s challenge. Then the campaign is built around the idea using whichever media is right for that audience. Sounds easy but few agencies work this way.

There must be something in the water in New Zealand (literally in this case) as there were other great winners such Tribal DDB with Live Rescue. To demonstrate the huge task the NZ Coastguard has finding vessels lost at sea, they capsized a boat, stranded 4 people in the ocean, and challenged New Zealand to find them, and save them, in a live-rescue event. Real-time ads drove people online to a search plane simulator to the race against the clock to find the missing boaties. GPS on the boat fed its location into the simulator, which also updated according to current weather conditions and the fading light. Volunteers soon realised they were faced with a hopeless situation, a feeling all too familiar to the Coastguard.

Moving a little further north we had a gold winner from Leo Burnett Sydney for best use of social media. Canon Photochains was developed to promote the Canon EOS DSLR camera range. It won a handful of awards at Cannes International Advertising Festival. The campaign used national television, print and online advertising to invite photographers of all skill levels to upload photographs to a chain started by Canon on the World of EOS website. Once online, people could also start their own photochains, or join those created by others.

OgilvyOne/Neo@Ogilvy Singapore won gold in the retail category for their Nike Trackball concept. Their brief was to “create something as unique and original as the new Nike CTR360 football boot that was to hit the shelves”. They created an interactive in-store experience where ball control and product knowledge of the Nike CTR360 was “both seamless and seductive”.

A special mention has to go to Amanda King, president of Tribal DDB Asia-Pacific, who was named Digital Agency Head of the Year.

Check out the full list of winners here.