December 4, 2011

Euro rising

While things in the European economy are looking extremely dodgy the advertising awards season in Europe keeps rocking like there’s nothing wrong. This past week saw both the Epica and Eurobest awards. Let’s look at some of the highlights…

EPICA d’Or for Interactive went to Jung von Matt in Stockholm for the Mini Getaway. I recently met the guys from Monterosa, the mobile agency that the agency tasked to make this happen. So instead of showing the old video here is a new one about the next Mini Getaway in Tokyo (it’s in Japanese just to annoy you all).



There was a GOLD in the web category for Lowe Brindfors and thei Magnum Ice Cream “Pleasure Hunt”. The internet is a place where all kind of pleasures exists. They wanted to build a light-hearted story in which Magnums new ice cream came out as superior to everything else out there: Internet’s ultimate pleasure. The mechanic was inspired by something that has engaged and united people for decades: classic platform games. But this time with a totally different platform: the Internet. The user controlled a young woman literally running trough the Internet collecting the ingredients for her ultimate pleasure, the Magnum Temptation. Below is a making of video.


Another GOLD, this time for branded content in social networks went to Forsman & Bodenfors for the REEBOK Promise Keeper. It was the first online running application (website,
iPhone/iPad-app and Android app) that would actually get you out and run. Every run you
promised to make in your online calendar was automatically posted on the social network of your
choice and spread to all of your friends. They would also be notified about whether you ran or
not. Every update was personal and became a direct message that spawned conversation.
Everything was built on the insight that a promise to everyone you know is more important than a
promise only to yourself.


Let’s head over to the Eurobest Awards and see who triumphed there.
The Grand Prix went to Hypernaked for Nokia. In this joint promotion with Burton, Push Snowboarding introduced a new way of marketing. Rather than simply telling people about Nokia’s most powerful smartphone, they developed a piece of new technology to show people it’s power. Using the smartphone at the core, they developed technology that could take snowboarding to its next stage by developing wearable sensors that bluetoothed simultaneously to the N8, giving snowboarders live tracking of their ride: speed, airtime and even fear.


Gold went to Tribal DDB Amsterdam for their latest Philips Obsessed with Sound campaign. To demonstrate that Philips is ‘Obsessed with sound’ and claim that you can hear every detail with the brand’s audio products, they created a unique interactive music video. They collaborated with the Grammy Award-winning Metropole Orchestra and recorded a specially composed music piece entitled “I’m No Prototype”- in 55 separate music tracks. On the site, viewers could experience the music video as a whole, played by the entire orchestra, and were invited to single out each musician to hear every detail.

Another Gold went to SapientNitro London for Foot Locker
Sneakerpedia was not only the world’s largest sneaker archiving project and the first ever visual-wiki, it wasdigital solution specifically designed to connect sneaker fans, enabling them to share, discuss, follow and help shape future sneaker trends.


Not every great project wins Gold. A Silver went to FORSMAN & BODENFORS for AMF. They knew that pension savings was boring but the future was exciting to people. Also, if you got a sudden message from a company, you were not very interested but if you got a message from a friend, you usually were. By offering people to send messages to their friends or colleagues that couldn’t be opened by the recipient until the year 2030, both the sender and the recipients would start to think about how life will be 20 years from now. And with a rising interest for the future, they would eventually have a rising interest on their pension.

——

Maybe we should have an advertising Olympics. See which countries would come out on top in digital. From looking at these winners the Europeans would give the rest of the world a run for their money.

March 8, 2010

Something strange in adland – episode 1

upside-down-houseYou know there’s something strange in adland when…

You don’t needs ads.

An iPhone app for VW is downloaded four million times generating an “80% increase in leads, test drive and quote requests without a print ad, banner or broadcast spot in sight”. AKQA have a track record for zigging instead of zagging. See the video case study here >

You don’t need agencies.

Clients like Doritos now ask consumers to create their ad campaigns (only they don’t know that advertising folks are the ones submitting the best ideas!)

tunickIn this New York Times article Stuart Elliot writes “BE afraid, Madison Avenue. Be very afraid”. He mentions various campaigns where “consumers” developed the ideas. But on the flipside, this blog post from ADLAB reveals a different story.

You don’t need a budget.

One agency got a year’s worth of media for only $500 by taking advantage of people with poor eyesight. See the story from McCann Erickson Israel…

You don’t need TV.

The 2009 Cannes Film Grand Prix goes to an interactive movie you can only see on the internet. Watch the DDB case study video…

Keep your eyes open – the strangeness isn’t over yet.

December 11, 2009

How to build great (digital) campaigns

under-constructionChapter 5 in David Ogilvy’s book, Confessions of an Advertising Man (the inspiration behind this blog), talks about the discipline needed to create truly successful campaigns. He believed that good advertising “sells the product without drawing attention to itself. It should rivet the reader’s attention on the product”. It should never say “what a clever advertisement”.

How does this apply to today’s world of digital media? Many “viral” campaigns are all about being clever while the product is almost invisible. Ogilvy was all about results and was obsessed with the performance-driven disciplines of mail-order, retail and consumer research. He talked about data years before it became part of the fabric of everyday life.

Ogilvy wrote his recipe for advertising campaigns that made “the cash register ring”. Let’s see how his “eleven commandments” work today:

1 – What you say is more important than how you say it.

“The content of the advertising, not its form” makes someone buy your product according to Ogilvy. In the world of print or TV advertising this may be more true than in the area of digital where brand experience is becoming more important. Form and content become blurred.

A great example is the Doritos Hotel 626 where the product makes way for an entertaining, branded experience that probably does more for the product than a site telling you about the way it’s made.


2 – Unless your campaign is built around a great idea, it will flop.

The face of advertising may be changing with new agencies springing up that offer new models and ways of thinking… but there is one thing that will never change. The power of the idea. Technology can support a great idea but not replace it. Campaigns built on a gimmick won’t have the legs to last very long.

Build your campaign around a bad idea (hello Windows 7 party) and you might end up with the wrong kind of publicity.

3 – Give the facts.

Here digital comes into it’s own. Where space was limited in print ads or 30 seconds on TV could only contain so much information, the internet allows people to dig as deep as they choose. Check out the Dove US website. With different levels of information and opportunities to engage, it really allows you to experience the brand philosophy and products in a tangible way.

4 – You cannot bore people into buying.

Ogilvy wrote that “the average family is now exposed to more than 1500 advertisements a day”. Imagine what that figure must be like today? It’s harder than ever to cut through the clutter and get the attention of your potential customer. Some of the best digital campaigns of the past year are definitely not boring. They even merit their own “making of”.

5 – Be well mannered, but don’t clown.

David’s comments are a definite throwback to the Madmen era of good manners and etiquette. Today “clowning” around online seems to be a required feature of most campaigns. What would Mr. Ogilvy think of it all? Even footballers are happy to be silly in this new campaign for the Fifa 10 game.

6 – Make your advertisements contemporary.

This is surely not what Ogilvy had in mind but being contemporary online means tapping into all the current digital trends. From crowdsourcing to social networking – the Public Polo campaign by Achtung captures the spirit of now.

7 – Committees can criticize advertisement, but they cannot write them.

A single-minded vision cannot be delivered by a group of people making decisions. The best online campaigns have clearly had a very brave client that is confident in a great idea.

Someone at McCann Erickson Israel came up with this original idea and the client went with it. Maybe because it also cost so little.


8 – If you are lucky enough to write a good advertisement, repeat it until it stops pulling.

In advertising history there have been many campaigns that have continued for years, constantly being updated but with one strong concept. The Louis Vuitton Journeys campaign is a great example of a good idea that travels far – and works equally well on and offline.

lv

9 – Never write an advertisement which you wouldn’t want your own family to read.

The Burger King Subservient Chicken was a great idea that didn’t offend anyone. But have they gone too far with the Shower Cam? Trust the British to risk offending consumers with a site where each morning a shower babe “shakes her bits to the hits at 9:30 a.m. every morning”. All to promote the BK breakfast.

10 – The image and the brand.

The internet throws up a big problem. How do you control all that is being said about your brand? Even if you have a consistent advertising and marketing message with a strong, identifiable style… someone somewhere online will upset the apple cart by trashing your carefully constructed image. This might be through an angry blog complaining about customer service or via someone mashing up your ads on YouTube.

11 – Don’t be a copycat.

Sorry to mention you again Microsoft but this was too late too lame…

December 3, 2009

Eurobest 2009 – Interactive

An interesting list of winners at last week’s Eurobest Awards… In the interactive category the Grand Prix went to Happiness Brussels for their Toyota IQ campaign.

iq

They came up with the idea of using the car to draw a new typeface that expressed its unique agility and control. Click here to see the award entry.

There were 6 golds awarded including the amazing Philips Cinema Carrousel site. One of my personal favourites is the Banner Concerts campaign that took two golds. Boondoggle of Belgium was the winning agency. I loved the idea of making real bands play in such confined spaces. Axion, the client, was really able to tap into the mindset of their youth audience with this concept…
…..

Of the six silvers four of them were from Belgium. There must be something in the water. Move over Sweden. One of my favourites was the interactive viral video from Happiness Brussels called Let it Ring, warning about the dangers of using mobile phones while driving. See video below…


Out of the 22 bronze winners the standout for me was the Philips Sensitive Males campaign by Crispin, Porter + Bogusky Europe.

sensitive

The campaign was to promote Philips NIVEA FOR MEN, a 100% waterproof device with built-in lotion from Nivea. And highlight the campaign site sensitivemales.com.

As part of the campaign they created a live banner event on one of Scandinavias biggest gadget and lifestyle sites. A famous Swedish comedian held an online therapy session, where men could upload their pictures and get help to speak openly about their worries, by borrowing the comedians mouth and let him do the talking.

There a lots of great campaigns to explore on the Eurobest website (not just Interactive!!). Enjoy…

Oh, almost forgot… a special congratulations to my French cousins at Ogilvy France for winning Eurobest Agency of the Year.

case study from stuffcore on Vimeo.