December 9, 2015

London Calling

The DMA Awards in London recently announced the 2015 winners. What I particularly like about these kind of awards is the fact that you can’t scam your way to a trophy. You need real results which means your campaign can’t have just appeared in an ad agency’s office building lobby or nearby cafe. The DMA’s celebrate real insights and intelligence combined with creativity and effectiveness. So let’s look at some winners…

 

Leo Burnett London – NSPCC Share Aware

Anyone with kids knows how scary it is with them sharing who knows what on social media. You can talk about it but most kids think their parents are not cool so whatever. This series of videos for the NSPCC brings to life the dangers of sharing in an entertaining way but still with a hard hitting message.

To quote the DMA website, “With a total of 65 million social impressions from a relatively small budget, the initial Facebook video post reached more than two million people on launch weekend – half organically, without paid media support. In six weeks, #shareaware achieved a Twitter reach of 54.8 million, helped by huge celebrity support, while the films were still watched on average every second and in 62 countries”.

The project won a gold for best film or video.

 

OgilvyOne UK – Battersea Cats & Dogs Home Looking For You

Another gold winner was a really innovative way to get people to care about adopting a dog. In real life, if a cute stray dog followed you it would tug at the heartstrings and make you want to take it home (as I’ve seen with my wife many times). OgilvyOne took this and harnessed RFID leaflets with digital outdoor and brought this to life. A virtual dog would follow people who took a leaflet and surprised them as they wandered around a mall.

According the the DMA website there were, “nearly 2,500 unique visits to the campaign microsite, more than 320,000 video views and 99% positive social sentiment. This amplification helped drive new visitors to the main Battersea site, with 79% of site traffic during the two weeks of our campaign period never having visited previously. The #lookingforyou Twitter feed was kept constantly updated with new dogs looking for homes and played its part in generating more than 200 new enquiries about rehoming specific dogs”.

 

Wunderman – CHECT The Next Photo

More gold, and another project that is all about doing something meaningful. Either I’m feeling emotional and choosing lots of projects with real purpose or the judges were moved to choose winners that do good. This won for best use of technology but wasn’t any huge, brain-straining leap in innovation. It simply used a phone camera flash and reflective paint to show how easy it is to detect a specific form of eye cancer in kids. Really nicely done.

 

Not every winner comes with a case video but still worth taking the time to read the write ups. Check out all the winners here >

 

 

November 20, 2012

Digital Media Awards 2012

This month’s Digital Media Awards ceremony in Beijing as part of the Digital Asia Festival highlighted some world-class creative thinking from across the region. I love this gold winner in the social media category from DDB DM9JaymeSyfu in the Philippines. It’s an integrated digital campaign by Gabriela, one of the world’s foremost advocates for women’s rights, that used Facebook in a simple but impactful new way that turned every participating profile into an ad for the campaign.

Another gold went to Clemenger BBDO Sydney for their TEDx project in the media innovation category. They answered the question “What Twitter Would Look Like, Without A Laptop Or Smartphone”. They produced a one-off installation that visualised the flow of ideas around the room in real time.

Wunderman (in partnership with Ogilvy, IKON, and Naked) took gold in the FMCG category with this innovative integrated campaign for Coke. They took the world’s most iconic brand and handed it over to the public using personalization on a mass scale. After 125 years of putting the same name on every bottle of ‘Coke’, whey tried something new and printed 150 of Australia’s most popular names on ‘Coke’ bottles and cans then invited Australians to ‘Share a Coke’. I really like the way they connected digital with physical experiences to make the brand even more social.

In the automotive category the BMW Crop Circle campaign by Interone China took silver. Their task was to create awareness for the compact BMW 1 Series family and to incite the target audience to register for a driving event. They leveraged a simple truth: Chinese people are very superstitious. Anything mysterious triggers immediate strong attention and passionate discussions. They used the fact that there had never been a crop circle in the country. See the case below.

For all the winners click here.

September 21, 2011

Spikes Asia part 2

What have the Simpson’s got to do with Spikes Asia? Well Simpson’s scriptwriter Joel Cohen was the speaker invited by DDB to talk about “Lessons in Creativity and Innovation from the Simpsons”. Easily the most entertaining speaker at the event, Joel explained how the writing team managed to stay original after 22 years on the air. He talked about some of the crazy scenarios that have appeared on the show and made a connection between that and innovation in our own industry. Joel explained how vital it is to connect with the audience before you innovate. What you say has to be relatable. At the same time big ideas don’t always fit into the context of the story so you have to filter. Joel had a few suggestions for anyone that hits a creative roadblock. Sometimes you just have to suggest the opposite of what you were thinking. But the best solution is jamming together with others to get more diverse ideas.

Laurie Coots, Chief Marketing Officer at TBWA did a seminar on the Gamification of advertising. With a stock photo heavy Powerpoint she said that gaming techniques drove participation leading to engagement and interaction. This leads to greater meaning and behavior change. In the attention economy we had to find greater brand value. The Starbucks app with its reward system was mentioned as one great example. However research shows that 80% of apps are downloaded less than 1000 times.  If you are using an app as part of your marketing campaign then gamification can help make participation addictive. Laurie shared an interesting case study for New York Library where gamification was used to get kids interested in books as a source of information that you can’t find through Google.

Wunderman US CEO Daniel Morel had the misfortune to speak first on day 3 meaning that the room was half empty. He presented a lot of statistics overlaid on stock photos and built his case around the need for Context, Community, Commerce and Creativity. With a big focus on mobile he presented cases from Austria airlines with their Red Guide, UrbanDaddy and HomePlus from Korea who saw sales go up by 130% and an 76% increase in members with their virtual stores in the subway. He was skeptical about co-creation saying that there was very little talent out there but that brands should listen to customers to get real insights. After showing the Decode with Jay-Z case (pronouncing the rapper’s name Gee Zay) he showed the Land Rover Mobile Fair Stand from Austria – a great example of how you can get your brand noticed and generate real results with some left-field thinking.

Jeff Benjamin from Crispin Porter + Bogusky was up next with a much more inspiring talk called Invent or Die. Ironically he opened with the example of Gutenberg who didn’t become rich with his invention of the printing press but died broke.  He said that only later did we realize what he had invented. Culture just wasn’t ready for it at the time. Jeff told us that it was the same for the steam engine and electricity. In a similar way it has taken 15 years for culture to finally catch up with technology and the internet. Not so long ago online dating seemed bizarre, online commerce seemed risky yet we now buy TVs from Amazon and even our notions of what friends are has been redefined by social networks. Digital technology is now an essential part of our lives and the public now expect innovation. Jeff said that the current creative revolution is being fueled by technology. If a brand is not inventing it isn’t going to be around much longer.

He gave a few tips for surviving:

Everyone can be an inventor – it isn’t just the creative department. Burger King chicken fries were invented by an account service guy in their agency.

Fill the void by working out what the consumer needs. The Pizza Hut pizza tracker came from the insight that ordering online is great but then you wonder where your pizza is at for the time it takes to arrive. The technology already existed within Pizza Hut to track employee efficiency. They just repurposed the data.

Prototype fast and often. Inventions don’t live on paper so take action to test your ideas.

Have fun – A great example is the Pringles Crunch Band app that came from their Sweden office.

Fail First. Fail Harder. It’s important to embrace failure and clients need to allow agencies to try things out that might seem risky.

Collaborate. It isn’t easy as many people don’t like sharing before an idea is fully formed. You need to be bold enough to bring in other opinions.

He showed some great examples of the agency inventing new things based on a simple brief. Small Business Saturday was not a campaign. They invented a day to help answer a need for the smaller companies that missed out on the retail frenzy of Black Friday and Cyber Monday that occurred every year after Thanksgiving.

Be fast and nimble, daring and relentlessly scrappy. You need to participate in technology to be able to invent new ways of using it. Be on Facebook and Twitter. The Whopper Sacrifice came about because the team were exploring what could be done with it.
Don’t stop – keep making it better. The Jello pudding face idea was a cool way to read the mood of people on Twitter. But rather than just use it online they came up with a giant pudding face billboard. Always ask what else you can do.

Be an entrepreneur. Pretend your client’s business is your own. What would you do? When the carrot farmers came with the brief they asked how the public could eat them as naturally as they eat junk food. So the carrots were packaged like packets of crisps (chips if you’re not English) and sold in vending machines.

Jeff talked about how the first 15% of work you do is 90% of the effort. That’s because you need to evolve your idea, experiment and keep changing it until it is right.

You need to invent where people are. That was the driver behind the Whopper Lust idea that ran on cable channel Direct TV.

Above all he said that we have to be delusionally positive. When you are asking yourself “how are we going to make this” and when you’re scared that’s when you find that positive energy breaks down walls.

Later I saw an inspiring talk by Mark Holden from PHd about 2016 – Beyond the Horizon. He started by talking about the famous IBM 1401 computer that is now in a museum. It filled a room but we have more computing power today in our mobile phones. The world is changing fast. Right now one in two people on earth has joined a social network. Indonesia has the second largest presence on Facebook with over 40 million users. If we consider the 1.2 billion social network members globally as “independent media owners” we can see the power of influence they have. He showed how in the UK 44% of mobile phone sales are influenced by online comments. In the next 5 years the true driver of business will be us – the people. But what drives us. It is the desire for abundance – everything, everyone and everywhere. He said that the future depends on Infrastructure, Interface and Internet.

Looking at Infrastructure & interface he predicted that by 2016 the cloud will be default. We’ll be using ultra HD connected TVs. Watching will be a social experience like we can see with HBO Connect.

You’ll be buying through your TV screen with t-commerce being worth 15 billion dollars by 2016. Embedded content will be accessed through natural user interfaces that will work like Kinect and use facial recognition to personalize information. Meanwhile mobile phones will be made with flexible graphene, maybe transparent with NFC, audio spotlight technology and use advanced augmented reality. The world will be seen through the “looking glass” of your mobile device with the internet smeared across cityscapes. Instore you can see instant user reviews while even your friends’ faces will launch augmented reality content.

The internet will continue to harness HTML5 so the web becomes one big app. We’ll see an increased socialization of the web where links become likes, vertical searches mean you can buy straight from search results and you’ll get direct answers to complex questions through AI. Social commerce will dominate and we’ll see an increase in gamification of the web to drive deeper engagement.

For medial planners there will be a social dashboard that will allow everyone to be tailored – even TV ads. There will be a need for audience management platforms where every aspect of brand communication can be optimized. The biggest threat will be social contagion since the power of consumer influence will be even bigger than today.

So what will the agency of 2016 look like? Creative will be more like a technology industry while media will be a data industry.

For the full story buy the book.
2016: Beyond the Horizon

In my next post I’ll share some of the award winning work from Spikes. As usual the Japanese dominated but Australia and New Zealand gave everyone a run for their money.

March 31, 2010

Week of Tweets #10

Oops, slipped a little in my weekly updates from the world of Twitter. It does mean that I have a few weeks to pick from so this should be good…

Interesting article – TV + Twitter @time: http://bit.ly/cdrmrW

  • Seems like Twitter is the new water cooler. But rather than “did you see that show” it is “I’m watching this great show, tune in with me and let’s chat in real time”. This effect contributed to the fact that the 2010 Super Bowl was the most watched U.S. TV show ever, surpassing the finale of M*A*S*H. This year’s Olympics far outrated the 2006 Games. The Emmys, Grammys and Golden Globes all increased, and on March 7, about 41 million people watched the Oscars, 5 million more than last year. Read on >

mobilemania

Thanks for sharing! RT @digital_london: Wunderman’s Mobile Mania: A Manual For The Second Internet Revolution: http://bit.ly/aprzBc

If you’ve been around as long as me you would have heard “this is the year of mobile” for about 10 years now. Maybe this time it’s true. This great manual from Wunderman spells out what to expect…

Phew! RT @AdweekDotCom: Old Is the New Young: Adults keep adolescent values – teens maintain a more ‘adult’ outlook. http://bit.ly/cleNap

  • I’ve actually noticed this with my own teenage daughter. She is sooooooo sensible. She really keeps us straight. I hear her say “what is that terrible music you’re listening to” or “please grow up. This article looks into this strange trend.

A 12 year old boy in my daughter’s class just made an iPhone app for the school. I now feel officially old.

  • OK, so the app could be better. But he did something I can’t do. So after being relieved that I’m the “new young” I suddenly feel ancient.

Careful brands, its a jungle out there! RT @simonmainwaring: Nestle’s social media meltdown. Lots to be learned here. http://bit.ly/cSO48S

  • The world of social media can be a minefield. Especially if your product costs the lives of cuddly hairy animals…

Time to change – RT @parsonsdigital: Why Today’s Ad Agencies Won’t Cut It Tomorrow: http://bit.ly/b1oRXX

  • There is so much talk about how the traditional agency is on its way out. I think they are smart enough to move with the times. Maybe they could move faster but they are not the quartet playing on the deck of the Titanic. Ad agency people are first on the boat.

ipad_179145xWill ads on the pad take off? NYTimes: Advertisers Show Interest in iPad http://s.nyt.com/u/Q_m

  • This weekend is the beginning of a new era in hyperbole. World-changing, magical, paradigm-shifting… Advertisers just want to know how to use it to sell more stuff. Let the fun begin.

Inspiring… RT @hellokinsella: Some nice stuff here. 2010 MediaGuardian Innovation Awards winners: http://bit.ly

  • This is the third year of the Megas (MediaGuardian Innovation Awards). These awards “recognise those at the pinnacle of achievement in media innovation. The finalists and winners represent thinkers and doers in UK media who act as a catalyst for change and inspire others with their ideas and actions”. Check out the winners. They are (dare I say it?) mega…

Great video interview. RT @darrylohrt: How Pepsico embraces digital – with @jkarpf & @boughb: http://bit.ly/byrsov

    RT @BBHLabs: Something for Saturday morning – our recap of SXSW, the highlights & themes; a @BBHLabs post – http://bit.ly/a34N0b

    • If you followed anyone on Twitter attending the event you would not have garnered much information. The best I got was from Lars Bastholm who ended up in a BBQ coma. But this article from BBH sums it up nicely.

    RT @BBHLabs: New Forrester report out: Future of Agencies: focus on Ideas, Interaction, Intelligence; @AdAge reviews: http://j.mp/cW1SQZ

    • Agencies should be ashamed if it takes a client to drag them into the 21st century. But that is what is happening. Read on

    I always end on a smile (that sounds a little rude).

    Nice RT @adland: RT @kylevanblerk Augmented reality before there was AR. Flipbook that creates a rainbow in your hand. http://bit.ly/avCoYm

    • Yes, there is more to life than digital.

    rainbow3

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    http://twitter.com/digitaladman